Europe Struggles to Defend Itself Against a Weaponized Dollar

BRUSSELS — The new Biden administration is making nice with the European Union, talking of renewed cooperation and suspending retaliatory tariffs stemming from an old dispute between Airbus and Boeing.
But despite the warm words and efforts at rebuilding trust, the American willingness to punish its European allies and impose sanctions on them in pursuit of foreign-policy goals continues to rankle.
It is an underlying tension, a ready reminder of the asymmetric power of the United States. That is especially so when it comes to what are known as secondary sanctions. While Iran and Russia, for example, may be the primary target of sanctions, the secondary sanctions punish other countries and companies — very often European — that do business with them as well.
Increasingly popular with Congress, secondary sanctions have been deployed to coerce allies to fall into line on any number of issues. In recent years, those have included the Nord Stream 2 natural gas pipeline, Iran’s nuclear program and the socialist governments of Venezuela and Cuba. The great fear is that they would some day be used by the United States against China — or even vice versa — leaving Europe squeezed in the middle.
Secondary sanctions cut off access to the American banking system, an effective threat because of the centrality of that system and the global reach of the dollar.
The weaponization of the American dollar and the Treasury is a marked vulnerability for Europe, which depends on open markets. It has prompted serious discussions of how to defend Europe and the euro from Washington’s whims, and it has become a central part of the argument about how to create “strategic autonomy,” so Europe can protect its own interests.
Last month, the European Union announced efforts to strengthen an “anti-coercion instrument’’ against “unfair trading practices.” The main sources of them are China and Europe’s self-professed ally and partner, the United States.
While Europe favors using multilateral institutions on trade disputes, “we cannot afford to stand defenseless in the meantime,” said Valdis Dombrovskis, the European Union’s commissioner for trade. The European Union must be able to defend itself “from those trying to take advantage of our openness,’’ he said.
The European Union’s foreign policy chief, Josep Borrell Fontelles, has condemned Washington’s use of secondary sanctions against European companies doing “legitimate business.’’

Source

0
Subscribe
Notify of
guest

5 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Caiman
1 year ago

Европа хочет и рыбку съесть и на тракторе прокатиться. Так не бывает. Одной рукой делать красивые жесты на трибуне, разглагольствуя о приверженности делу защиты прав человека во всем мире, а другой делать гешефт с теми, кто правами человека подтирает задэтот фокус плохо окончится. Мягкая политика умиротворения диктатора породила в прошлом веке страшную войну. Но кто-то не желает учиться

0
Ivanych
1 year ago
Reply to  Caiman

Пока Европе удается следовать в русле полюбившейся политикии вашим и нашим”, ничего меняться не будет и выводов, соответственно, тоже никаких сделано не будет, а вот если рыбку отобрать

0
Bahus
1 year ago
Reply to  Ivanych

Уже

0
nebug
1 year ago
Reply to  Bahus

пока еще нет, но все возможно

0
Pathfinder
1 year ago

по-моему, заигрались америкосы в санкции, это у них стало такойуниверсальной ответкойнада на все, what, как им кажется, угрожает Америке. Think, европейцы найдут способ, how “зеркальноответить

0
Authorization
*
*
Registration
*
*
*
A password has not been entered
*
Password generation
5
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x